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Morocco - Themes

Adventure

Agadir

The largest seaside resort in Morocco, located on the shores of the Atlantic Ocean near the foot of the Atlas Mountains,  destroyed and then rebuilt following an earthquake in 1960, is the most modern of the country’s cities. Hike to the Kasbah a set of fortifications perched up atop a hill in the city’s oldest districts, and relish in the breathtaking view across the city 

Learn More »

Ait Benhaddou

No trip to Morocco is complete without a visit to Ait Benhaddou, the iconic, UNESCO World Heritage site that has graced Hollywood blockbusters from the Mummy to Gladiator alike. Founded along the age-old caravan trail that linked Marrakech to the Sahara, the crumbling adobe Kasbah and surrounding fortress sits against the backdrop of the High Atlas and served as a Berber trading post.

Learn More »

Azrou

Tucked away in the hills of the Middle Atlas Mountains,  Azrou named for the large, black volcanic outcrop in the centre of town. The city serves as the foundation of regional trade and social life.

Learn More »

Casablanca

Forget the romance of the film, Casablanca is one of the largest cities in Africa, a vast, sprawling metropolis at the heart of Morocco’s industry and commerce. The modern city, however, belies its colourful history which can be traced back to the Roman and Phoenician traders and has been shaped by Portuguese, Spanish and French colonial powers.

Learn More »

Chefchaouen

Chefchaouen is a picturesque town in northern Morocco, a vibrant splash of blue set against the dramatic backdrop of the Rif Mountains. Founded in 1471 as a fortress town to curb the advances of the Portuguese invaders, the city multiplied, with the arrival of Jewish and Moorish refugees following their expulsion from Spain in 1492.

Learn More »

Erfoud

Towards Morocco’s south-eastern border with Algeria, the rocky canyons and spectacular gorges tumble into the Erg Chebbi – huge wind-sculpted dunes measuring up to 350m high. Welcome to Morocco’s Saharan desert. One of the country’s most captivating corners, a sea of ever-changing sand that evokes the romantic mystery of North Africa.

Learn More »

Erg Chebbi

Shifting dunes over 28km from north to south and reaching heights of 160m, Erg Chebbi may be a modest example compared with the vast sand seas of Algeria, Libya and Namibia, but it is extraordinarily picturesque. The rose gold dunes rise dramatically above a pancake-flat, black hammada and glimmer in stunning shades of pink orange and violet as the afternoon sun descends.

Learn More »

Errachidia

Located in the southern central part of the country the town of Errachidia is situated on the borders of South-eastern Morocco and is home to Tafilalet regarded as one of the most historical regions of Morocco.

Learn More »

Essaouira

700km south of Tangier, Essaouira is Morocco’s prime coastal resort, a charming UNESCO fortress city on the Atlantic seaboard and a beautiful destination for winding down at the end of the trip.

Learn More »

Fez

Dating back to the 8th century, the imperial city of Fez was the capital of Morocco for over 400 years and an intriguing centre of political and religious power. At its heart, the famous walled medina of Old Fez, Fès el-Bali, has changed little over the centuries and stands in stark contrast to the French-inspired “Ville Nouvelle” built pre-independence in the 1950s.

Learn More »

Ifrane

Nicknamed ‘small Switzerland,’ Ifrane has a diverse landscape as well as a climate more lenient than elsewhere and is home to the largest cedar forest in the world, Ifrane National Park.

Learn More »

Imouzzer

Imouzzer is a small Berber town, that was isolated until the 1930s. It is known for the spectacular Cascades or waterfalls.

While only 60kms north of Agadir, the terrain and landscape is not for the fainthearted as you travel long steep mountainous roads to reach the town, but the journey is worth it for the tranquillity and breathtaking views as far as the eye can see.

Learn More »

Marrakech

If Fes is the cultural heart of Morocco, then Marrakech is undoubtedly the tourist epicentre, an imperial city that resonates across North Africa and which evokes the mystery and charm of Morocco. Nestled amidst the foothills of the High Atlas, the town is centred around the bustling Jamaa el Fna; the first market square set deep within the medieval medina.

Learn More »

Meknes

Founded in the 11th century as an Almoravid fortress town, Meknes is a charming imperial city and former capital of Morocco just 40 miles south-west of Fes. Its regional importance can be traced back to the Sultan Moulay Ismail who in the 17th century set about transforming into a regional powerhouse replete with palaces, mosques, gardens and mansions.

Learn More »

Nkob

Nkob is the capital village of the Berber Ait Atta tribe and belongs to the Confederation Ait Atta spread along Ouarzazate, Errachidia, and Azil Provinces. This ancient Berber tribe existed before Arab and Islam’s entrance into Morocco in the seventh century. 

Learn More »

Ouarzazate

Ouarzazate, located at the intersection of the valleys of Ouarzazate and Ouad Dades-in the High Atlas-which forms the Oued Drâa downstream, is the nerve centre of the vast region of southern Morocco, and a beautiful mixture of oases, Kasbahs and flourishing valleys and a vast desert that attracts tourists of different nationalities to discover the natural beauty of this city.

Learn More »

Rabat

The capital of Morocco, Rabat is a charming imperial city on the Atlantic seaboard that provides a relaxing contrast to the hustle and frenetic traffic of Marrakesh and Casablanca. Like many Moroccan cities, it is divided between the French-inspired “Ville Nouvelle” with pleasant leafy boulevards and the original 12th-century medina and walled town.

Learn More »

Sidi Ifni

Previously a former Spanish enclave, Sidi Ifni is the ideal starting point for a hike or a bivouac to discover the surrounding Berber villages. Between the sea, the mountain and the vast desert of the south, built on a rocky plateau, the town overlooks the Atlantic.

Learn More »

Tamegroute

Tamegroute’s Zawiya Nassiriyya is said to be a cure for anxiety and high blood pressure. Besides its miracle cures, Tamegroute is best known for its labyrinth of ksour, explored by yourself or with a local guide. 

Learn More »

Tamraght

Tamraght is a small Berber fishing village situated on a hillside overlooking the Atlantic Ocean seventeen kilometres north of Agadir.

Eat brunch at the Babakoul cafe in a cozy, relaxed atmosphere inspired by a view of the beach, wooden benches and overshadowing trees. Take a seat with the local cats and puppies who famously make their beds amongst Babakoul’s cushions.

Learn More »

Tangiers

Tangiers sits at the entrance to the Straits of Gibraltar, a fascinating city of intrigue, colour and power at the very tip of North Africa. Formerly a Berber settlement founded in the 5th century BC, its strategic importance at the crossroads of Africa and Europe has dominated its rich history and seen it shuffled between the regional powers of the time.

Learn More »

Tetouan

Tetouan located at the foot of the Rif Mountains is just a few kilometres from the sea. The medina, a Unesco World Heritage site, appears to not have changed in several centuries. 

Learn More »

Zagora

Perched at the very end of the magical Draa Valley, the desert outpost Zagora lies on the famous caravan trail to Timbuktu – “52 days away” as the village’s renowned sign announces. Surrounded by traditional Berber villages, several of which slowly being engulfed by the desert, the area offers an alternative to the towering Saharan dunes of the Erg Chebbi further north-east.

Learn More »

Cultural, Historic or World Heritage Site

Agadir

The largest seaside resort in Morocco, located on the shores of the Atlantic Ocean near the foot of the Atlas Mountains,  destroyed and then rebuilt following an earthquake in 1960, is the most modern of the country’s cities. Hike to the Kasbah a set of fortifications perched up atop a hill in the city’s oldest districts, and relish in the breathtaking view across the city 

Learn More »

Ait Benhaddou

No trip to Morocco is complete without a visit to Ait Benhaddou, the iconic, UNESCO World Heritage site that has graced Hollywood blockbusters from the Mummy to Gladiator alike. Founded along the age-old caravan trail that linked Marrakech to the Sahara, the crumbling adobe Kasbah and surrounding fortress sits against the backdrop of the High Atlas and served as a Berber trading post.

Learn More »

Azrou

Tucked away in the hills of the Middle Atlas Mountains,  Azrou named for the large, black volcanic outcrop in the centre of town. The city serves as the foundation of regional trade and social life.

Learn More »

Casablanca

Forget the romance of the film, Casablanca is one of the largest cities in Africa, a vast, sprawling metropolis at the heart of Morocco’s industry and commerce. The modern city, however, belies its colourful history which can be traced back to the Roman and Phoenician traders and has been shaped by Portuguese, Spanish and French colonial powers.

Learn More »

Ceuta

Ceuta named the gateway to Europe, has long been the reason for  Spanish-Moroccan conflict. Finally won by Spain, Ceuta remains on Moroccan lands.

Learn More »

Chefchaouen

Chefchaouen is a picturesque town in northern Morocco, a vibrant splash of blue set against the dramatic backdrop of the Rif Mountains. Founded in 1471 as a fortress town to curb the advances of the Portuguese invaders, the city multiplied, with the arrival of Jewish and Moorish refugees following their expulsion from Spain in 1492.

Learn More »

Erfoud

Towards Morocco’s south-eastern border with Algeria, the rocky canyons and spectacular gorges tumble into the Erg Chebbi – huge wind-sculpted dunes measuring up to 350m high. Welcome to Morocco’s Saharan desert. One of the country’s most captivating corners, a sea of ever-changing sand that evokes the romantic mystery of North Africa.

Learn More »

Erg Chebbi

Shifting dunes over 28km from north to south and reaching heights of 160m, Erg Chebbi may be a modest example compared with the vast sand seas of Algeria, Libya and Namibia, but it is extraordinarily picturesque. The rose gold dunes rise dramatically above a pancake-flat, black hammada and glimmer in stunning shades of pink orange and violet as the afternoon sun descends.

Learn More »

Errachidia

Located in the southern central part of the country the town of Errachidia is situated on the borders of South-eastern Morocco and is home to Tafilalet regarded as one of the most historical regions of Morocco.

Learn More »

Essaouira

700km south of Tangier, Essaouira is Morocco’s prime coastal resort, a charming UNESCO fortress city on the Atlantic seaboard and a beautiful destination for winding down at the end of the trip.

Learn More »

Fez

Dating back to the 8th century, the imperial city of Fez was the capital of Morocco for over 400 years and an intriguing centre of political and religious power. At its heart, the famous walled medina of Old Fez, Fès el-Bali, has changed little over the centuries and stands in stark contrast to the French-inspired “Ville Nouvelle” built pre-independence in the 1950s.

Learn More »

Ifrane

Nicknamed ‘small Switzerland,’ Ifrane has a diverse landscape as well as a climate more lenient than elsewhere and is home to the largest cedar forest in the world, Ifrane National Park.

Learn More »

Imouzzer

Imouzzer is a small Berber town, that was isolated until the 1930s. It is known for the spectacular Cascades or waterfalls.

While only 60kms north of Agadir, the terrain and landscape is not for the fainthearted as you travel long steep mountainous roads to reach the town, but the journey is worth it for the tranquillity and breathtaking views as far as the eye can see.

Learn More »

Marrakech

If Fes is the cultural heart of Morocco, then Marrakech is undoubtedly the tourist epicentre, an imperial city that resonates across North Africa and which evokes the mystery and charm of Morocco. Nestled amidst the foothills of the High Atlas, the town is centred around the bustling Jamaa el Fna; the first market square set deep within the medieval medina.

Learn More »

Meknes

Founded in the 11th century as an Almoravid fortress town, Meknes is a charming imperial city and former capital of Morocco just 40 miles south-west of Fes. Its regional importance can be traced back to the Sultan Moulay Ismail who in the 17th century set about transforming into a regional powerhouse replete with palaces, mosques, gardens and mansions.

Learn More »

Melilla

Melilla, an autonomous Spanish city on the Moroccan coast, has its central economy rooted in cross-border commerce, with a population divided between Spanish Christian and Berber Muslim, giving it a healthy multicultural atmosphere. 

Learn More »

Nkob

Nkob is the capital village of the Berber Ait Atta tribe and belongs to the Confederation Ait Atta spread along Ouarzazate, Errachidia, and Azil Provinces. This ancient Berber tribe existed before Arab and Islam’s entrance into Morocco in the seventh century. 

Learn More »

Ouarzazate

Ouarzazate, located at the intersection of the valleys of Ouarzazate and Ouad Dades-in the High Atlas-which forms the Oued Drâa downstream, is the nerve centre of the vast region of southern Morocco, and a beautiful mixture of oases, Kasbahs and flourishing valleys and a vast desert that attracts tourists of different nationalities to discover the natural beauty of this city.

Learn More »

Oujda

Oujda is a border town, located in the extreme northeast of the country, on the border of the eastern Rif region.

Learn More »

Rabat

The capital of Morocco, Rabat is a charming imperial city on the Atlantic seaboard that provides a relaxing contrast to the hustle and frenetic traffic of Marrakesh and Casablanca. Like many Moroccan cities, it is divided between the French-inspired “Ville Nouvelle” with pleasant leafy boulevards and the original 12th-century medina and walled town.

Learn More »

Sidi Ifni

Previously a former Spanish enclave, Sidi Ifni is the ideal starting point for a hike or a bivouac to discover the surrounding Berber villages. Between the sea, the mountain and the vast desert of the south, built on a rocky plateau, the town overlooks the Atlantic.

Learn More »

Tamegroute

Tamegroute’s Zawiya Nassiriyya is said to be a cure for anxiety and high blood pressure. Besides its miracle cures, Tamegroute is best known for its labyrinth of ksour, explored by yourself or with a local guide. 

Learn More »

Tamraght

Tamraght is a small Berber fishing village situated on a hillside overlooking the Atlantic Ocean seventeen kilometres north of Agadir.

Eat brunch at the Babakoul cafe in a cozy, relaxed atmosphere inspired by a view of the beach, wooden benches and overshadowing trees. Take a seat with the local cats and puppies who famously make their beds amongst Babakoul’s cushions.

Learn More »

Tangiers

Tangiers sits at the entrance to the Straits of Gibraltar, a fascinating city of intrigue, colour and power at the very tip of North Africa. Formerly a Berber settlement founded in the 5th century BC, its strategic importance at the crossroads of Africa and Europe has dominated its rich history and seen it shuffled between the regional powers of the time.

Learn More »

Tetouan

Tetouan located at the foot of the Rif Mountains is just a few kilometres from the sea. The medina, a Unesco World Heritage site, appears to not have changed in several centuries. 

Learn More »

Volubilis

Volubilis is Morocco’s foremost Roman ruin founded on the very edge of the empire in the 3rd century BC. Earthquakes and looting have robbed the site of many of its architectural treasures yet many remains including the Basilica, Arch of Caracalla and Capitoline Temple as well as several impressive mosaics.

Learn More »

Zagora

Perched at the very end of the magical Draa Valley, the desert outpost Zagora lies on the famous caravan trail to Timbuktu – “52 days away” as the village’s renowned sign announces. Surrounded by traditional Berber villages, several of which slowly being engulfed by the desert, the area offers an alternative to the towering Saharan dunes of the Erg Chebbi further north-east.

Learn More »

Directors Choice Destinations

Erfoud

Towards Morocco’s south-eastern border with Algeria, the rocky canyons and spectacular gorges tumble into the Erg Chebbi – huge wind-sculpted dunes measuring up to 350m high. Welcome to Morocco’s Saharan desert. One of the country’s most captivating corners, a sea of ever-changing sand that evokes the romantic mystery of North Africa.

Learn More »

Fez

Dating back to the 8th century, the imperial city of Fez was the capital of Morocco for over 400 years and an intriguing centre of political and religious power. At its heart, the famous walled medina of Old Fez, Fès el-Bali, has changed little over the centuries and stands in stark contrast to the French-inspired “Ville Nouvelle” built pre-independence in the 1950s.

Learn More »

Marrakech

If Fes is the cultural heart of Morocco, then Marrakech is undoubtedly the tourist epicentre, an imperial city that resonates across North Africa and which evokes the mystery and charm of Morocco. Nestled amidst the foothills of the High Atlas, the town is centred around the bustling Jamaa el Fna; the first market square set deep within the medieval medina.

Learn More »

Honeymoon

Sidi Ifni

Previously a former Spanish enclave, Sidi Ifni is the ideal starting point for a hike or a bivouac to discover the surrounding Berber villages. Between the sea, the mountain and the vast desert of the south, built on a rocky plateau, the town overlooks the Atlantic.

Learn More »

Sea Cruise

Tangiers

Tangiers sits at the entrance to the Straits of Gibraltar, a fascinating city of intrigue, colour and power at the very tip of North Africa. Formerly a Berber settlement founded in the 5th century BC, its strategic importance at the crossroads of Africa and Europe has dominated its rich history and seen it shuffled between the regional powers of the time.

Learn More »

Shopping

Casablanca

Forget the romance of the film, Casablanca is one of the largest cities in Africa, a vast, sprawling metropolis at the heart of Morocco’s industry and commerce. The modern city, however, belies its colourful history which can be traced back to the Roman and Phoenician traders and has been shaped by Portuguese, Spanish and French colonial powers.

Learn More »

Marrakech

If Fes is the cultural heart of Morocco, then Marrakech is undoubtedly the tourist epicentre, an imperial city that resonates across North Africa and which evokes the mystery and charm of Morocco. Nestled amidst the foothills of the High Atlas, the town is centred around the bustling Jamaa el Fna; the first market square set deep within the medieval medina.

Learn More »

Rabat

The capital of Morocco, Rabat is a charming imperial city on the Atlantic seaboard that provides a relaxing contrast to the hustle and frenetic traffic of Marrakesh and Casablanca. Like many Moroccan cities, it is divided between the French-inspired “Ville Nouvelle” with pleasant leafy boulevards and the original 12th-century medina and walled town.

Learn More »

Somewhere completely different

Erg Chebbi

Shifting dunes over 28km from north to south and reaching heights of 160m, Erg Chebbi may be a modest example compared with the vast sand seas of Algeria, Libya and Namibia, but it is extraordinarily picturesque. The rose gold dunes rise dramatically above a pancake-flat, black hammada and glimmer in stunning shades of pink orange and violet as the afternoon sun descends.

Learn More »

Ifrane

Nicknamed ‘small Switzerland,’ Ifrane has a diverse landscape as well as a climate more lenient than elsewhere and is home to the largest cedar forest in the world, Ifrane National Park.

Learn More »

Melilla

Melilla, an autonomous Spanish city on the Moroccan coast, has its central economy rooted in cross-border commerce, with a population divided between Spanish Christian and Berber Muslim, giving it a healthy multicultural atmosphere. 

Learn More »

Ouarzazate

Ouarzazate, located at the intersection of the valleys of Ouarzazate and Ouad Dades-in the High Atlas-which forms the Oued Drâa downstream, is the nerve centre of the vast region of southern Morocco, and a beautiful mixture of oases, Kasbahs and flourishing valleys and a vast desert that attracts tourists of different nationalities to discover the natural beauty of this city.

Learn More »

Undiscovered Beaches

Agadir

The largest seaside resort in Morocco, located on the shores of the Atlantic Ocean near the foot of the Atlas Mountains,  destroyed and then rebuilt following an earthquake in 1960, is the most modern of the country’s cities. Hike to the Kasbah a set of fortifications perched up atop a hill in the city’s oldest districts, and relish in the breathtaking view across the city 

Learn More »

Sidi Ifni

Previously a former Spanish enclave, Sidi Ifni is the ideal starting point for a hike or a bivouac to discover the surrounding Berber villages. Between the sea, the mountain and the vast desert of the south, built on a rocky plateau, the town overlooks the Atlantic.

Learn More »